Review and interview: Delroy Edwards – Rio Grande (L.A. Club Resource)

Review and interview: Delroy Edwards – Rio Grande (L.A. Club Resource)
California's own Delroy Edwards is definitely one of the more unique figures in the international circles of electronic music. Though not limited to one genre at all, he created a distinctive sound that the simple-minded might prematurely identify as "muffled". Now, just sounding "muffled" wouldn’t be that impressive of course but Edwards has way more to offer, he wrenches a certain style from his machines you may not have heard before that often. His last album "Hangin' At The Beach" was an amazing odd-job between Synth Pop, Electro, Ariel Pink and cheap soundtracks, for his new album "Rio Grande", again released on his own L.A. Club Resource imprint, he travelled deep into the House and Techno territory he visited for his EPs on L.I.E.S. before and gave us 22 tracks, no more no less, of strangely energetic gritty bliss. The albums starters "El Bandito Pt. 1" and "Love Is In The Air" set the tone, Warehouse beats, mighty retro bass lines, hissing hi-hats and blurred synth harmonies, all thickly covered with Californian desert dust, come together and show the quite spectacular result of sounding like Anthony Shake Shakir playing from a tape that stuck in the cassette player of a Dodge Shelby for 30 years. Edwards obviously doesn’t care about cleanliness, he wants it to be raw and sketchy. Yet "Rio Grande" also shows Edwards other qualities. He’s a real master of the 3-minute stripped-down track, building them en gros from mutant rhythms and neon coloured discoid layers. There's "Banquet Of Wizards And Warlocks", a spectacular thick shuffle borrowed from Hall & Oates' "Maneater" followed by bitter sweet synth harmonies gleaming over a breathless groove in "Time Out" and that's the way "Rio Grande" goes on and on and on. Edwards strings together all these weird pearls, showing a downright bacchanalian joy over his very own sounds. Others may carefully construct their constructions, Mr. Edwards follows the path of intuition. Some tracks hypnotically circle round a stoic synth progression (the fittingly named "Let It Rock!"), others merely consist of kind of Yacht Rock keyboards ("Midnight Rendez-vous"). Unbelievable 80ies funk goes wild and glitchy in "The Hawaii Guys", "Raw Beats 1" is just that and nothing more. Highly entertaining this is, highly exciting and without any negativity, there's nothing vicious here. You see, Delroy Edwards is doing it his way and if you get into it, you'll get a record for any occasion. Dancing or drinking, riding low or flying high, driving around Santa Ana in a Dodge Shelby or taking the U-Bahn in Berlin, these tracks will keep you going. Big deal! Written by João Geck Interview with Delroy Edwards talking about the album and more. Questions by João Geck. SEED - delroy photo Q: “Rio Grande” is (obviously) a very groovy record. How important is the club/nightlife-aspect to you? Do want the people to dance? Do you want to dance? A: I'm very drawn to rhythms and grooves and I like that people dance to them. In the beginning of my career I chose to present my music in a club setting because I felt it was a way to reach a large amount of open minded people at once. I didn't do this because I go out to clubs, I actually don't do that. Q: Where do you get your inspirations from? And where do you see yourself in the history of American House music? A: I am inspired by everything in life -- the good and the bad. I feel I will always remain an important figure in Warehouse music, my style is unique and cannot be replicated. Q: In a way your music (and also the way your label L.A. Club Resource operates) has a punk attitude to me, a strong feel of “just do it, no matter what”. Would you agree? And how important is independence and the idea of DIY to you? Yes I would agree with that. I am impatient when it comes to things so I just go with how I feel, the concept of DIY is not so important to me. I could care less how the stuff is made as long as it looks alright and I can supply the community with interesting music. Q: Your work always has something experimental and free-spirited about it. How do you create your music and how do you work in the studio? I love being in the studio and I make sure not to limit myself, ever. It's a lot of fun. Q: And finally: what are your plans for the future? And what’s next on L.A. Club Resource? I have a lot more records coming out, each one more different from the last. I can't say exactly what's next because that would just ruin the surprise. Thank you. You can BUY Delroy Edwards - Rio Grande, released on L.A. Club Resource HERE from whatpeopleplay.com.

Review and interview: Delroy Edwards – Rio Grande (L.A. Club Resource) – MP3 & WAV Downloads:

Spread the word about Review and interview: Delroy Edwards – Rio Grande (L.A. Club Resource) – MP3 & WAV Downloads:

If you like Review and interview: Delroy Edwards – Rio Grande (L.A. Club Resource) you may also be up for this: